Example 4 - Location Popup Window (Part 1 of 2)

This example will demonstrate the use of the “Location Popup Window” in the Group section of the LPanel. We will determine what the shortest distance is for a hypothetical journey from Old Orchard Beach, Maine (in the northeast corner of the United States) to La Palma, California (in the southwest corner of the United States).
Old Orchard Beach, Maine was named after an apple orchard that was planted in the 1600s along the high bluffs overlooking the 7-mile sandy beach; an orchard that acted as a landmark for sailors-of-old as they navigated the Maine coastline. La Palma, California was originally named “Dairyland” due to 18 dairies that once operated within its tiny 1.76 square-mile (4.56 square-kilometer) boundaries.
Irfanview screenshot
Starting in the “Group” section, click on the “OL” (Open Location Popup Window) text-link to the right of the “Group Lng” input box to open the two-section “Location Popup Window.”
Irfanview screenshot
Now, click anywhere on the Google map (outside of the faded-white circle) to place a yellow marker on the map ... and then look at the top section of the two-section Location Popup Window—that is now overlaying the Group section of the LPanel—to observe the following: 1) the “Last yellow marker in PolyPocket location” box displays the nearest “street” or “location” address stored in the Google Maps database for the last yellow marker listed in the Pocket PolyArc PolyPocket—if any such address exists; 2) the “Red marker A location” box displays the nearest “street” or “location” address stored in the Google Maps database for red marker “A”—if any such address exists; 3) the “Gold marker V location” box displays the nearest “street” or “location” address stored in the Google Maps database for gold marker “V”—if any such address exists; 4) in the bottom section of the Location Popup Window the “Poly-A polyline midpoint location (yellow/aqua)” box displays the nearest “street” or “location” address stored in the Google Maps database for the midpoint of the yellow “Poly-A” polyline (or for the midpoint of the white, “geodesic” “Poly-A” polyline over longer distances)—if any such address exists. [See Example 2 for “geodesic” information.] Note: To hide the faded-white circle on the Google map while working with the Location Popup Window: proceed to the “Markers” section and click the orange “no” radio button to the right of the “Circle Radius (meters)” input box. The faded-white circle is no longer displayed on the map.
Irfanview screenshot
Still in the “Group” section, type “Old Orchard Beach, Maine” into the “Type a Quik Search location” input box, and then click on “Old Orchard Beach, Maine” from the dropdown menu choices you will see. The Google map will automatically move to your chosen location.
Irfanview screenshot
Still in the “Group” section, click on the green (Show Poly-M Polyline) radio button, located to the right of the “Poly-M Lat” input box. This will display the aqua “Poly-M” polyline that overlaps the first half of the yellow “Poly-A” polyline, starting from the gold marker “V” endpoint of the “Poly-A” polyline. Next, click on the “OQ” (Open marker A Quik Search) text-link (located to the right of the text “Red marker A location”) to open the “Type marker A Quik Search” input box—and type “La Palma, California” into that box. The red marker “A” will automatically move to your chosen location.

Continue to Example 4 (2 of 2)
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